15
May 17

CIO insight – Why So Much of a CIO’s Day Is Devoted to Security

65% of network and systems admins struggle to determine whether app issues are caused by the network, systems or apps, while 53% run into difficulties measuring latency and delay problems when troubleshooting apps.

A growing number of CIOs, other technology leaders and IT professionals are spending a considerable amount of their time troubleshooting security-related issues, according to a recent survey from Viavi Solutions. The resulting report, “State of the Network Study,” reveals that a significant number of survey respondents are spending a quarter of a standard work week on the detection and mitigation of threats. One of the trend-drivers is that email and browser-based malware has increased over the past 12 months, as has the overall sophistication of attack methods. “Enterprise network teams are [devoting] more time and resources than ever before to battle security threats,” said Douglas Roberts, vice president and general manager of the enterprise and cloud business unit for Viavi Solutions. “Not only are they faced with a growing number of attacks, but hackers are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their methods and malware. Dealing with these types of advanced persistent security threats requires planning, resourcefulness and greater visibility throughout the network to ensure that threat intelligence information is always at hand.

More of the CIO Insight slideshow from Dennis McCafferty


08
May 17

ZDNet – Cloud and the New CIO

Cloud changes everything, and never more so than the role of the CIO, as the recently-released State of the CIO 2017 report[1] reveals.

As the report points out, CIOs still perform the delicate balancing act “between crafting technology strategy and driving business innovation while overseeing routine IT functional tasks such as cost control, vendor negotiation, crisis management, and operational improvements.”

However, although not explicitly stated, it is implicit that cloud services will continue to play a large part in making the CIO more efficient. For example, cloud computing is now the default way for enterprises to deliver new services, whether or not they are officially sanctioned by and acquired through the IT department. This plays to the LOB manager’s need to ‘just get things done’ because convenience and speed will – as so many commentators have already pointed out – always trump security and process. We’ll return to this point a bit later.

More of the ZDNet article from Manek Dubash


05
May 17

Greylock – The New Moats

Why Systems of Intelligence are the Next Defensible Business Model

To build a sustainable and profitable business, you need strong defensive moats around your company. This rings especially true today as we undergo one of the largest platform shifts in a generation as applications move to the cloud, are consumed on iPhones, Echoes, and Teslas, are built on open source, and are fueled by AI and data. These dramatic shifts are rendering some existing moats useless and leaving CEOs feeling like it’s almost impossible to build a defensible business.

In this post, I’ll review some of the traditional economic moats that technology companies typically leverage and how they are being disrupted. I believe that startups today need to build systems of intelligence — AI powered applications — “the new moats.”

More of the Greylock article from Jerry Chen


04
May 17

Continuity Central – How personal biases can affect business continuity decisions

Managerial biases such as overconfidence and myopia can explain many failures in business decisions but new research shows how personal biases can be used to improve decision making.

Conventional approaches to eliminating biases focuses on ‘changing the mind’: if people can be trained to recognise their biases and think more logically, better outcomes are likely. However, increasing evidence suggests that such a de-biasing approach is not enough for effective decisions, because it only deals with our conscious half – what Daniel Kahneman famously called System 2. Our automatic half – Kahneman’s System 1 – also plays a role in determining a decision and it is sensitive to our surrounding environment. Even contextual factors, such as the weather being sunny or cloudy, can significantly influence the decisions made.

More of the Continuity Central article


03
May 17

ZDNet – Cloud v. Data Center: Key trends for IT decision-makers

Cloud-based compute, networking and storage infrastructure, and cloud-native applications, are now firmly on the radar of CIOs — be they in startups, small businesses or large enterprises. So much so that, whereas a few years ago the question facing them was “Which workloads should I move to the cloud?”, it’s now becoming “Which, if any, workloads should I keep on-premises?”. While most organisations will probably end up pursuing a hybrid cloud strategy in the medium term, it’s worth examining this turnaround, and the reasons behind it.

The general background, as ZDNet has explored in recent special features, is the competitive pressure for organisations to undergo a digital transformation based on cloud-native applications and methods such as DevOps, in pursuit of improved IT and organisational performance.

More of the ZDNet article from Charles McLellan


01
May 17

Arthur Cole – The Reality of an Intelligent IoT

The Internet of Things (IoT) may be barely off the ground, but developers are already looking for ways to imbue the technology with high degrees of intelligence.

On one level, an intelligent IoT is a reason unto itself given that the scale and complexity of the data environment is beyond the capabilities of today’s management tools. But ultimately, the expectation is that much of the IoT will govern itself, and that includes the basic interactions between systems and users.

Zebra Technologies’ Tom Bianculli gave eWeek a good overview of all the ways in which intelligence is likely to affect the IoT. From the intelligent enterprise itself, capable of dynamic data streaming, real-time analytics and self-managing applications, to advances in health care, transportation, retail and virtual every other industry, the intelligent IoT has the potential to revolutionize the way we live, work and play.

More of the IT Business Edge article from Arthur Cole


28
Apr 17

IT Business Edge – Perception or Reality: Your Security System Is Probably Weaker Than You Think

How confident are you about your cybersecurity operations? If you are like the vast majority of respondents in Arctic Wolf Networks’ recent survey, you are highly confident in your cybersecurity defenses.

However, the perception of cybersecurity operations doesn’t match the reality for these mid-market companies. While 95 percent of the respondents think their security posture is well above average and 89 percent think their security systems are combatting attacks, large majorities also admit that they aren’t able to stop certain types of threats and they are so overwhelmed with the breadth of overall IT that security isn’t given the attention it deserves. In a formal statement, Brian NeSmith, CEO of Arctic Wolf Networks, said:

Most mid-market enterprises believe they are safe because they have the traditional perimeter defenses in place. This falls far short of what’s needed for rigorous security in today’s complex threat environment. The challenge smaller enterprises face is that they have all the same security issues as large enterprises with only a fraction of the budget and less specialized personnel.

More of the IT Business Edge post from Sue Marquette Poremba


27
Apr 17

Harvard Business Review – What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team

What are you doing to stop the diligent pursuit of mediocrity in your business?

The toughest test of a manager is not how they deal with poor performance — it’s how they address mediocrity.

I’ve been struck over the years watching executives opine in public about the need for “accountability” and “high performance,” then complain helplessly in private about one or two middling members of their own team. You have no moral authority to ask other managers to hold people accountable if you’re not doing so yourself. Are you sure you’re doing enough to push for high performance? What do you do when someone’s work is good but not great? How many employees do you have whose performance isn’t bad enough for termination, but whom you’d pass on if you could get a do-over on hiring them?

Unfortunately, if you’re hoping for a silver bullet to address a mediocre performer, I have little to offer. Chronic mediocrity is a symptom of ineffective leadership, not anemic personnel.

More of the Harvard Business Review post from Joseph Grenny


26
Apr 17

Data Center Knowledge – Busy in the Data Center? Here’s How to Make Time for Learning

Continuing education should be a top priority for anyone involved with data centers or the entire IT field for that matter. It’s especially important in industries such as healthcare for example. While new technologies and approaches don’t always save lives, they can certainly alter the landscape of the market. Times change, and so should you. While we may agree that continuing education is fundamental to both organizational success and the development of one’s career, it’s not always easy to fit it into a busy schedule.

Keep in mind, continuing education does not have to mean an additional university degree or even a new certification. Your CE approach can take a number of different forms.

More of the Data Center Knowledge article from Karen Riccio


25
Apr 17

Baseline – IT Pros Spend Much of the Day Handling Emergencies

Think that unplanned IT work is not a big problem? Here are hard numbers on the impact of unplanned work on the average IT professional. 29% of every day, and five times longer to resolve issues as compared to identifying issues. How are you reducing unplanned work?

It’s no secret that IT professionals have to cope with many unexpected situations during the workday. Unpredictability comes with the territory as digital enterprises become more sophisticated and complicated. But what might be surprising is the amount of time those unplanned activities consume every day: almost one-third of working hours. That’s among the key findings of “The 1E 2017 IT Incident Response Report,” a survey of IT professionals conducted by 1E, a provider of software lifecycle automation solutions. The study shows that operational issues such as outages and troubleshooting take up the most time, followed by help desk issues. Sumir Karayi, founder and CEO of 1E, found the amount of time spent on unplanned incidents surprising.

More of the Baseline article from Eileen McCooey