10
Nov 17

IT Business Edge – Getting on the Right Side of Automation

It’s a fait accompli at this point that the enterprise will become significantly more automated over the next decade, both in terms of IT operations and infrastructure management. And while this will most certainly affect the knowledge workforce, and probably cost jobs, it will also bring about a higher level of data productivity that will ultimately enhance the value of both human and technological resources.

Automation works best when it is directed at the rote, repetitive tasks that occupy the majority of the knowledge worker’s time. This can include everything from system mapping and resource provisioning to data tracking and analysis. If there is one thing that the current crop of automation solutions excels at, it is taking over these mindless operations to allow humans to concentrate on the more creative aspects of fulfilling the business model.

More of the IT Business Edge article from Arthur Cole


09
Nov 17

Continuity Central – Cascading effects and escalations in wide-area power failures

A new academic paper has been published that looks at the cascading impacts of wide-area power outages. Supported by London Resilience, the paper has been written by the Cascading Disasters Research Group of UCL’s Institute For Risk And Disaster Reduction.

‘Cascading effects and escalations in wide-area power failures’ aims to “provide a synthetic overview of the cascading effects caused by wide-area power failures, and to define the recurrent impacts and sources of escalation.”

The format uses bullet points and examples to facilitate reading in conditions of limited availability of time.

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08
Nov 17

Baseline – Business Units Participate in Tech Buying Process

In today’s enterprises, line-of-business (LoB) departments are playing a bigger role in the technology buying process, especially when it concerns applications and services related to mobile and collaborative technologies. And increasingly, those two technologies are viewed as a single entity by most IT and business executives. Those findings highlight the “CDW Digital Workspace Solutions Report,” which is based on a survey of nearly 2,000 IT and non-IT executives who participate in their organization’s purchasing decisions for digital workspace solutions. This view aligns with CDW’s definition of digital workspace as the culmination of various technology silos coming together to seamlessly connect people and get work done effortlessly, anytime, anywhere and on any device. “The fact that our survey found 41 percent of digital workspace solutions are now selected by departments outside of IT shows how pervasive and integral voice, video and other collaboration technologies are becoming to organizations,” observed Nathan Coutinho, director of workspace solutions for CDW.

More of the Baseline slideshow from Eileen McCooey


07
Nov 17

ZDNet – SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS: Understand the differences

Understanding the cloud is critical to the future of business. Here’s a brief explanation of the three layers by which cloud services are delivered.

Cloud computing is one technology moving faster than almost all others toward becoming table stakes in enterprise IT. In 2017 alone, the public cloud services market is predicted to grow 18 percent, hitting a value of $246.8 billion, according to research firm Gartner.

Understanding the cloud can help business leaders make more strategic investments and remain competitive going forward. Cloud clarity starts with understanding the model itself.

As a service
According to 451 Research analyst Carl Brooks, for a technology solution to qualify as “as a Service,” it has to meet the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) definition parameters, which he paraphrased as “self-service, paid on-demand, elastic, scalable, programmatically accessible (APIs), and available over the network.”

More of the ZDNet article from Conner Forest


06
Nov 17

Fast Company – This Is Why We Default To Criticism (And How To Change)

“Susan doesn’t pull her weight. She’s always negative, people don’t like her.”

“Robert is just incompetent. Why am I asked to do my job well when he gets to skate by?”

“This department would be better off if Beth was fired, everyone knows it, what are you going to do about it?”

Tim Cole, now founder and CEO of The Compass Alliance, used to hear criticism like this regularly in a previous work environment. Tasked with taking over a department he admits had a “septic culture,” Cole stepped into a quagmire of low morale. There was legitimate debate on shutting the operation down,” he explains, “despite the contribution to profitability.”

More of the Fast Company article from Lydia Dishman


03
Nov 17

ZDNet – How to turn down bad IT ideas at work – without upsetting your colleagues

Modern CIOs hear an awful lot about the importance of engagement, but partnerships are a two-way street. Sometimes you need to tell people — whether that’s someone on your team, a line-of-business peer, or your boss — that their idea won’t work. What’s the best way to tell people they’re wrong? ZDNet hears from five CIOs.

1. Let people know quickly and remain open to new ideas
Juan Perez, CIO at UPS, says executives must tell people when they’re wrong, regardless of level. At the same time, Perez says relaying this information is a sensitive task. “The worst thing that can happen is that you come across as someone that is not respecting and valuing their opinions and views,” he says.

More of the ZDNet article from Mark Samuels


02
Nov 17

Fast Company – Survey: one in four IT workers are worried that their skills could become obsolete

For the most part, IT workers like their jobs: 79% claim they are satisfied with their positions (up from 73% in 2015) and a whopping 45% are “very satisfied,” according to the new industry report “Evaluating IT Workforce Needs.” However, there is one looming concern among these workers. One in four are worried that their skills could become obsolete, which probably includes anyone who fears automation (read: everyone) and anyone working in programming languages like Visual Basic, Flash, or even Ruby.

More of the Fast Company article


01
Nov 17

Continuity Central – PwC survey highlights massive corporate planning failures when it comes to cyber security

44 percent of the 9,500 executives in 122 countries surveyed say they do not have an overall information security strategy; 48 percent do not have an employee security awareness training programme, and 54 percent don’t have an incident response process.

PwC has published its 2018 Global State of Information Security Survey (GSISS).

Executives worldwide acknowledge the increasingly high stakes of cyber insecurity. 40 percent of survey respondents cite the disruption of operations as the biggest consequence of a cyber attack; 39 percent cite the compromise of sensitive data; 32 percent cite harm to product quality, and 22 percent cite threat to human life.

Yet despite this awareness, many companies at risk of cyber attacks remain unprepared to deal with them. 44 percent say they do not have an overall information security strategy. 48 percent say they do not have an employee security awareness training programme, and 54 percent say they do not have an incident response process.

More of the Continuity Central post


31
Oct 17

ZDNet – DIY-IT guide to disaster preparedness: Because it’s always something

2017 has been an extremely difficult year for much of North America. We were hit with hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Mary in the southeast, and wildfires through much of the west. Other regions suffered their own disasters and challenges, as well.

Hurricane risk blankets the southern and eastern coasts. Landslides occur anywhere the ground is too soft with too many rainstorms. Even in areas not normally subject to coastal hurricanes, heavy rains can cause catastrophic flooding. High winds and atmospheric conditions cause tornadoes, particularly through the middle states. Tectonic fault lines slice through the core of of our nation, causing small and devastating earthquakes.

More of the ZDNet article from David Gerwitz


30
Oct 17

Continuity Central – Future business continuity: how technology and strategy improvements will impact the profession

The business world is facing a period of rapid change with various emerging technologies, especially artificial intelligence and machine learning, expected to fundamentally change the structure of organizations and society. How might these developments impact the business continuity profession? Charles Boffin makes some suggestions…

Everyone agrees that business continuity will be changing over the next few years and into the foreseeable future; but, as with any other changing landscape, the future is never a specific of finely shaped object: it is a vision. For business continuity, the end vision is a fully resilient environment which means that things don’t fail and, if they do, they are resolved immediately with no loss of service. This general view of the future of our profession is fine as we build our technological credentials and capabilities, but there are three prime movers involved, and each requires a different response:

1. External factors that can be forecasted

This covers issues such bad weather, demonstrations and civil unrest, economic factors, viruses (human!) and other aspects where we can see events unfolding or likely to happen in a given place. In these cases, responses can be planned and contingencies created.

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